On the Nose Results

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From teens up through mature adults, it should come as no surprise that “the nose job” is the most common cosmetic surgical procedure after breast augmentation. After all, the nose is the physical center of the face, which means that it can draw the eye to the other features of one’s face, or distract from them. This is a huge reason why teens and young adults, according to WebMD, account for roughly half of the total number of patients undergoing the procedure.
That said, there’s more to the story than that. Within the overall rhinoplasty category, there are are aesthetic procedures to remove a bump, straighten the bridge, reshape the tip. On the more practical end, there is septoplasty (a procedure done to straighten the nasal septum, the partition between the two nasal cavities) and turbinate reduction, which corrects the problem of nasal obstruction by reducing the turbinate size and thereby decreasing airway resistance while preserving the natural function of the turbinate’s, whose function it is to clean and humidify the air as it moves through your nose into your lungs. We are also offering combination of rhinoplasty (nose) and genioplasty (chin) to provide some patients a greater look of balance within their face.

Rhinoplasty is definitely not a “one size fits all” proposition–and thank goodness our community has recognized this. There was a time, about a half-century ago, when many patients got the same type of upturned, “button” nose, and though it was smaller, the nose looked “done” and identical to others who had the procedure.

Patients also need to understand that the nose is an important organ that brings air into the lungs and facilitates your sense of smell as well as taste. It is comprised of skin, bone and cartilage, as well as many blood vessels and nerves. The function of the nose depends on anatomy and internal lining of the nose that may be affected by allergy and sinus problems. The anatomy may become compromised if there is deviation or collapse of internal structures, including the septum, internal nasal valve, turbinate enlargement and external nasal valve.

We want it to not only look good, but also not interfere with his or her breathing function or the integrity of their natural bone structure based on their ethnic and genetic make up. Our before and after photos of these procedures (http://www.liftmd.com/before-after/rhinoplasty), reflect this philosophy. Seeing is believing, especially with a practice whose patients represents Los Angeles’ wonderful cross section of global cultures and people from all walks of life.

 

While before and after photos offer insight into how a practice approaches rhinoplasty from a broad perspective and the individual patient’s perspective, the secret to a successful rhinoplasty starts with a complete conversation between the patient and a board certified plastic surgeon.

Although the patient’s desires are the first priority, we want to be careful to balance those desires with the most realistic expectations and procedures that will leave the patient looking natural, and even more importantly, breathing correctly. Furthermore, a patient should realize that although there will be some instant gratification, there is also a long-term commitment involved. Although there is not a lot of downtime and you can see results in less than a few months, like a lot of cosmetic procedures, the full results are typically seen in 1-2 years, while those with more complex surgery such as reconstructive procedures, advanced tip work, and thick skin will likely continue to see final results even after two years.

Is a rhinoplasty right for you? Call 310-285-0400 and request a personal consultation with us today. Why wait?

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